TRAINING AUDIO: Back to School: Teaching “non-cognitive skills”

File Format:  Audio Broadcast – TURN UP YOUR VOLUME TO LISTEN!

Training Credit:  1 hour – Broken into three parts (See below)

To Listen, Click Here.  Then click on the white arrow in the blue circle beneath the photo of the child.

From National Public Radio station WBEZ, This American Life presents:

Back to School:  How “non-cognitive skills” — qualities like tenacity, resilience, impulse control — are being viewed as increasingly vital in education.

Originally broadcast Sep 14, 2012.

As kids and teachers head back to school, we wanted to turn away from questions about politics and unions and money and all the regular school stuff people argue about, and turn to something more optimistic — an emerging theory about what to teach kids, from Paul Tough’s new book How Children Succeed.

This broadcast is in three parts.

Part one 4.5 mins:  Host Ira Glass talks about his experiences reporting on education and the unending question of how we can make schools better.

Part two 38.5 mins:  Paul Tough discusses how “non-cognitive skills” — qualities like tenacity, resilience, impulse control — are being viewed as increasingly vital in education, and Ira speaks with economist James Heckman, who’s been at the center of this research and this shift.

Doctor Nadine Burke Harris weighs in to discuss studies that show how poverty-related stress can affect brain development, and inhibit the development of non-cognitive skills.

Part three 11 mins:  How non-cognitive skills can be taught to older kids — who have gone much longer without learning things like self-control, conscientiousness and resilience.  Economist James Heckman then discusses the ways in which this shift in emphasis could change the way we practice education and the way we think about learning.

To Listen, Click Here.  Then click on the white arrow in the blue circle beneath the photo of the child.