The Care & Feeding of Caseworkers

Every foster child has a caseworker. Your relationship with caseworkers is vital to your success as a foster parent.

Caseworkers are mandated to physically see each child under their supervision at least once a month.

With budget cuts, the number of caseworkers has declined while each caseworker’s case load has increased. It’s not unusual for a caseworker to have 40 or more children they are responsible for.

Multiply that figure by the number of court reviews, parent visitations, emergencies, writing up 90-day reviews on each child, foster home visits, court hearings, etc., and you’ll see that being a caseworker is a thankless job – not unlike the feeling foster parents often get!

Maintaining a good, respectful & helpful relationship with caseworkers pays off when you have a problem.

The key to a good working relationship with your caseworker is to maintain communication about your foster child. In most cases, a simple, concise weekly update by email is sufficient. This serves two important purposes: One, you have a dated written record and two, the caseworker has a dated written record.